Servant Leadership: Character + Competence = Credibility

Servant Leadership

Character + Competence = Credibility

“Character without capacity usually means weakness in a leader, but capacity without character means danger,” says David Gergen. Servant Leadership development and character formation go hand-in-hand. Who a leader is is just as important as what a leader does.

Street Cred

When describing the core elements of how to persuade and influence others to a particular way of thinking, Aristotle said that effective leaders must possess three things: ethos (character), logos (logic) and pathos (emotion). Ethos was foundational to the other two qualities as it served as the “credibility-factor” of the speaker-leader.

The Ethos Factor

Today we call this the authenticity-factor, integrity, or trustworthiness. That’s why leadership is an inside job. It begins with the leader as a person and emanates outward. Today ethos still matters because some research suggests that 8 out of 10 people don’t trust leaders. Trust erosion has real consequences tethered to it. The challenges we face today are rooted not in economic, political, social or technological shortcomings, but ultimately in failures of leadership.

Both/And Leaders

Even Harvard Business School has made recent changes to its famous leader-building MBA curriculum. Harvard CMO Brian Kenny, said, “These changes are aimed to create leaders of competence and character, rather than just connections and credentials.” Being smart is not good enough. We need leaders who are smart and possess character.

Leadership Is Character In Action 

That’s why leadership and management are different. Both are vital to the success of an organization. Management is about doing (planning, budgeting, organizing). Leadership is about being (who we are and how we express our character). James Hunter said, “Character is our moral maturity and commitment to do the right thing regardless of personal costs. Character involves the will to respond to stimuli according to values and principles rather than to impulses, whims and urges.” Leadership is character in action.

Strategy Alive™ – A 7-Step Strategic Map To Success

StrategyaliveA Way Forward 

Maps and compasses are important when traversing unfamiliar terrain and entering into new territory. The same is true in business. Maps are still helpful in a world that is filled with so many unknowns and daily market adaptations. Having clear strategic direction that is both nimble and market sensitive is crucial to bringing vision and resource alignment and mission/cause fulfillment. Let me offer my version of a simple 7-step strategic mapping process that generates innovative solutions to move an organization, large or small, forward.

Strategy Alive™ consists of seven steps: Examine. Explore. Extract. Establish. Execute. Evaluate. Excite. Here’s how this open-ended strategic process works:

  1. Examine

First, we take time to examine the past in order to identify lessons learned. Hindsight is always a great teacher. So is data. This enables us to capture, catalog, and carry insights into the present. Strategic thinkers carve out lessons learned from past experience and brings those findings forward into the future.

  1. Explore

Next, the model focuses its attention on the current environment in, outside of, and around the organization. We ask honest questions, explore different factors, emerging trends and technologies, uncertainties, customer interests, needs and values, and consider future possibilities. This process enables us to get an accurate picture of the current realities, strengths, challenges, threats, and opportunities that exist inside and outside an organization and leverages.

  1. Extract

We look at the pool of potential possibilities that we’ve generated and extract the unique core capabilities, strengths, and differentiators that are embedded within an organization, brand, product or service. We identify, prioritize and leverage those opportunities that have the highest probability of success, ones which will generate the largest return on investment, and opportunities which will fulfill our mission and/or cause and make the world a better place.

  1. Establish

Next, we establish an action plan with SMART goals (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-bound) that align all resources (people, financial, property, brand, etc.) and energies with the central purpose and the guiding principles of the organization (mission, vision, values).

  1. Execute

A carefully constructed (yet flexible) plan of execution is crafted, communicated, and implemented with excellence. (Scenario plans are also created with the high probability of using some or all of them depending upon market fluctuation, market clarity, new opportunities that have emerged, unknowns becoming known, etc.)

  1. Evaluate

We honestly evaluate results with clear metrics that measure progress. Success factors are identified. Unforeseen challenges are addressed. People are held accountable. Tweaks, changes and courageous realignments, recalibrations, and resource reallocations are made when and where necessary.

  1. Excite

Finally, the Strategy Alive loop is completed as we excite others by celebrating the small wins and sharing the credit to those who have earned it all throughout the process. Good leaders celebrate the people and the process of doing good and hared work together as much as they do reaching the end result. Leading strategic change often has more to do with the relational side of the equation that we can ever imagine.

Strategy Alive Map

This strategy map serves as a kind of checklist to help maneuver our way through the problem-solving maze of life and business in a sequential and linear fashion. It takes things from the world of the conceptual and converts them to the realm of the concrete. The complex becomes simple. Enigmas can be unraveled.

Following a strategy map gives us a common language to communicate with others in our organization. It helps identify root problems. It helps us learn from the past. It uncovers potential gaps in our thinking. It gathers relevant information that informs. It paints a compelling picture of our true strengths and internal attributes. Strategy maps not only guide us, but they aid us in generating new insights and sparking creative solutions.

An Ongoing Process

One of the most overlooked aspects to the success of any strategic process being implemented is to ensure that it doesn’t become perceived as a “one-time-event” and then shelved. For this iterative process to achieve its intended aim, and in order to help people and/or organizations reach full potential, these life-affirming processes must become an ongoing practice.

Change is Permanent

Finally, a strategy map provides a clear and detailed set of “next-steps” to aid us as we plan for the future and navigate into uncharted waters. Heraclitus was right when he said, “The only thing permanent in life is change.” Our global economy has forever changed. Every organization needs women and men who can help course them into new frontiers of innovation and viability. Organizations, teams (and people) that are forward-thinking, healthy and strategic-minded, live with intentionality. They welcome people, practices, processes, and catalytic mechanisms that help them expand their core capacity and achieve their full potential. That’s why strategy is alive!

Servantology: The Periodic Elements of Trusted Leadership

Servantology_Chris_Meade_LeadershipAlive_copyright 2016

Servant Leadership

During the last two decades, there has been an explosion of interest in the philosophy and practices of “Servant Leadership.” Many business thought-leaders believe that Servant Leadership is the new leadership model for the 21st century. This is especially true in light of the fact that the American workforce is radically changing and by 2025 over 65% of all workers in the U.S. will consist of the Millennial generation who view leadership from a new perspective.

It’s Not About You

Harvard Business Review recently stated, “The idea of Servant Leadership is a great place for new managers to start…The reason is simple. When you have a servant mentality, it’s not about you. Removing self-interest and personal glory from your motivation on the job is the single most important thing you can do to inspire trust. When you focus first on the success of your organization and your team, it comes through clearly.” Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “Not everybody can be famous. But everybody can be great, because greatness is determined by service.” Authentic servant leadership is always for the benefit of others and not the leader.

Putting Others First

Servant Leadership has its roots in the groundbreaking work of former AT&T executive, Robert K. Greenleaf, who coined the term almost 35 years ago. Servant Leadership emphasizes serving others, including employees, customers and the community. The Greenleaf Institute asserts that “Servant leadership is a philosophy and set of practices that enriches the lives of individuals, builds better organizations and ultimately creates a more just, compassionate and caring world.”

Servants First

The principles contained in the Servant Leadership model are grounded in the notion that leaders are servants first. The desire to lead others surfaces out of a motivation to serve others. Respected leadership is about putting the legitimate needs, goals, and priorities of the followers and constituents first. Ken Blanchard said, “Servant leadership is all about making the goals clear and then rolling your sleeves up and doing whatever it takes to help people win. In that situation, they don’t work for you, you work for them.”

Leadership Is Built Upon Character

True leaders know that leadership is not about them; it’s about others. That’s one reason why leadership has more to do with character than management skills. Servant Leadership is not about exalting yourself, but lifting others up. It emanates first from a desire to serve others. That’s why Robert K. Greenleaf said “good leaders must first become good servants.”

A New Kind of Leadership

James Hunter defines servant leadership as “…the skill of influencing people within a specific context to work enthusiastically toward goals identified as being for the common good, with character that inspires confidence.” Bottom line: The best leaders use influence instead of intimidation to achieve results. They build trusted relationships that motivate followers. They have solid character that enables them to sustain a life of service and they genuinely care about their coworkers and community at large. They want things for people and not just from them. Servant leadership: A new kind of leader for a new kind of world.